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Taylor Swift Fans Are Dedicating Their Savings Accounts To Her Upcoming Tour

The night in August when Taylor Swift announced her newest album, Midnights, at the MTV Video Music Awards, Cayla Jordan renamed one of her savings accounts, which had previously been designated for a girls’ trip to Mexico, to “Tay.”

“I love Taylor Swift and I have been around for Taylor Swift being super popular like the 1989 tour, and then Taylor Swift not being very popular for the Reputation tour,” said Jordan, a 31-year-old Swiftie living in Nashville. “I knew this tour there was going to be an insane amount of people who wanted to buy tickets, so I didn’t want my money to be a reason I couldn’t go.”

Jordan said she would be willing to spend $1,000 on tickets to Swift’s upcoming Eras Tour.

Turns out Jordan isn’t the only fan who has been diligently saving money for potential concert tickets. It’s been four years and six albums since Swift went on tour, so fans are ready to see their favorite blondie prance around onstage. Ticket prices will range from $49 to $449, which has pretty much been the case for all her tours.

SeatGeek estimates that the Reputation tour’s average ticket price was $279. Ticket prices are up across all genres and venues, and Ticketmaster prices have more than tripled since the mid-’90s in part because the company often withholds about 90% of tickets for the secondary market, which then upsells them up to 7,000% more, according to an investigation from Last Week Tonight. Ticketmaster did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Lindsey Morris, a 27-year-old Swiftie who lives in Georgia, said she has a separate savings account dedicated to Swift tickets that she started about three years ago when she missed out on the Reputation tour. She told BuzzFeed News she would be willing to spend up to $500 for a seat near the stage or $800 if she got to meet Swift (the singer has not charged for meet and greets in the past).

Even so, Morris said it’s “kind of ridiculous” that tickets are so expensive, something she blames on the resale market for jacking up the price.

“As much as I love Taylor, I do have to put a cap on it because life is expensive,” Morris said. “But I have enough in my account to be able to at least hopefully get right by the stage if they’re reasonably priced.”

Kristen Palczewski, a 28-year-old Swiftie, who lives in Fort Worth, Texas, said she is “totally prepared” to spend $1,000 on a ticket.

“My friend asked, ‘What’s your budget?’ and I said, ‘What’s my credit card limit?’” Palczewski said.

Kristin Joyner has been a huge Swiftie since the beginning but has never seen her live. After missing the 1989 and Reputation tours, she knew she had to make it to the Eras Tour. She doesn’t know exactly what to expect regarding ticket prices, but she is planning on spending at least $400, and is willing to go up to $700, to see Swift perform in Chicago. She has already put away $100 in savings for the ticket.

“I want my first experience to be the best experience it can be,” the 28-year-old from Indiana said.“I’m going to do what I have to do to get those tickets. If I have to get resale, I want to have the savings for that. The tickets sell out in minutes sometimes.”

Shae-Lynn Perreault has been a fan and has wanted to go to one of Swift’s concerts for as long as she can remember. She plans to spend up to $400 for the ticket, but because Swift hasn’t announced any shows for Canada, where Perreault lives, the 24-year-old will have to travel to Seattle to see Swift and also spend money on a hotel and transportation.

“I’ll spend the money and worry about the plan later,” Perreault said.

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